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Newbies looking for advice

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Eljay1219
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Joined: Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:10 pm
Your Vessel Info: 1993 44' Tollycraft CPMY

Newbies looking for advice

Postby Eljay1219 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:45 am

Greetings to all!
We’d like to say hi and introduce ourselves. We are Lori and John, a (soon to be) retired couple who have never owned a boat. We were going to move into the home we own on the Gulf coast of Florida when we retire in about a year and a half. Even before Irma hit our area, we had decided that we didn’t want to move into a land locked house, no matter how beautiful the area. Instead we want to spend our retirement living aboard a motor yacht and doing some exploring. We love the idea of the freedom living onboard would give us as well as the ability to enjoy life living simply.
We have no experience in boat ownership, operation, piloting, maintaining, navigating….you get the picture. This is what we want to do and are going to learn everything we need to make this a reality. We are hoping for some sound advice from people who are doing just that. We have been doing a lot of research and are starting to zero in on the type of boat we would like to buy. It has to be something fuel efficient as it doesn’t make sense to spend $100,000 on a boat and not be able to go anywhere with it since it burns 30-40 gph. We are looking at trawlers and similar since we are not looking to go anywhere in a hurry and fuel burn of 2-6 gph would be perfect.
We welcome any comments, suggestions, resources that would help us to make this our reality.

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scallywag
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Re: Newbies looking for advice

Postby scallywag » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:13 pm

Why not use your 44' Tollycraft? Is this your craft or your dream craft? CaptForce lived aboard a sailboat for many years. RTB and his wife live aboard a 36' Hunter. There are others that live aboard. A twin engine boat burns twice as much fuel as a single engine driven vessel. A twin engine vessel is easier to handle than a single engine vessel. I prefer a diesel over gasoline engine. Janice lives aboard a 23' cruiser. She has a blog. Very interesting reading.
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tex
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Re: Newbies looking for advice

Postby tex » Thu Sep 21, 2017 11:17 pm

There are many more questions to contemplate. Will you be cruising coastal or maybe blue water? Just you two or often guests? Are you mechanical and handy enough to do some work yourself? Is one head enough? Have you selected a style that favors you. Sundeck, Sedan, Europa, Aft Cabin, Pilothouse, Down East. You want economy, so are you OK with under 10 MPH speeds tops? Having fun with your search is a big part of a good start in boating.
Fixing, spending, and occasional cruising in FL
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tex
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Re: Newbies looking for advice

Postby tex » Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:11 am

For livability and economy at that price range, the full displacement Willard 40, 36' Krogen Manatee, or perhaps even a Pilgrim 40 would top the list as the most economy per ft. of space. They are also very good values and keep their resale, but they are old boats. Less economical but with equal livability is the Hatteras 43 DCMY. Built like a tank, simple systems, and great layout. At trawler speeds, the twin Detroit diesels are easy to get parts for and are still pretty good on fuel, but the hull is semi-planing design that can give a good turn of speed and massive fuel consumption along with it. Another semi-planing candidate is the under-rated Bayliner 4588 and 3888. Both roomy with good utilization of space, although not quite as rich in the interior trim level. The Hino Diesels still have parts available and there are a lot of them around.
One of the most livable vessels around and probably the biggest surprise in value is the style-challenged Endeavour 36 Trawler Catamaran. Twin 125 HP Yanmars can push it to 16 knots but economy shines down around 7-8 knots. Three staterooms and a huge head with separate shower. These are newer boats with late model engines and often with NMEA 2000 systems for ease of electronic additions. Galleys are well laid out and lots of storage too. Most go for around 150 K but I've seen 125k on at least one sale.
The people at Endeavour are great to work with too.

Well, there's a few Ideas to start with. Good luck.
Fixing, spending, and occasional cruising in FL
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CaptForce
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Re: Newbies looking for advice

Postby CaptForce » Tue Sep 26, 2017 7:36 am

tex wrote:Source of the post For livability and economy at that price range, the full displacement Willard 40, 36' Krogen Manatee, or perhaps even a Pilgrim 40 would top the list as the most economy per ft. of space. They are also very good values and keep their resale, but they are old boats. ..................


My experience and skills are with sailboats, but I do admire these choices by Tex. There is a huge interwoven amount of knowledge that will lead to your ability to make a good choice. I think one of the best sources to gain more knowledge would be to enroll in the local Power Squadron boating courses that are usually available with little cost at community adult education centers.
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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scallywag
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Re: Newbies looking for advice

Postby scallywag » Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:53 pm

You have just heard from the experts. CaptForce and Tex.

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