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Falling off, getting back aboard.

ImageA forum to discuss issues related to living aboard your boat here. This is the place for "doing it" rather than "planning to do it".
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tex
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Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby tex » Sat Aug 18, 2018 1:13 am

Janice mentioned the importance of planning a method of getting back aboard if one should fall overboard, so I thought it would be best to begin another thread to address the subject.

Janice: What steps have you taken to improve Seaweed’s board-ability? I recall you were still desiring a tuna door on your transom.
When life is hard, eat marshmallows!

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janice142
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby janice142 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 12:42 am

Hi Larry.

Seaweed has a great ladder that rides on the swim platform. It folds down, three steps beneath the water.
I found in boatyards it was a good way to board the boat too:

Image

I do have hopes for a tuna door. Recently I acquired two large heavy duty hinges for the tuna door.
When I get to the boat yard I'm going to price out having one cut into the transom.

With the ladder I can get myself out of the water and onto the swim platform. For safety, I'd like a tuna door. Actually a half-door -- about 18" deep and wide. There are a couple other 'glass jobs at the transom. If I can afford everything, that would be great. Otherwise I'll wait.

Seaweed is already almost perfect. Except for the stuff that needs fixing, installation, upgrading, etc. There's always something.
Janice aboard Seaweed
Trawler cruising on a nickel budget
http://janice142.com
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby tex » Mon Aug 20, 2018 1:26 am

I’ve got another problem, Janice. Those skinny little steps on those tiny ladders hurt my feet...got no fat pad. I’m actually looking at a dock ladder with the wide steps, like on this Great Harbour 37.
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby ka8uet » Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:55 pm

I've got a fold down ladder (with the skinny steps!) from my transom steps on the port hull. It has a line so it can be pulled down from the water, and it's fully (all four steps!) underwater, which makes it easy, except for the skinny steps. I'm thinking of ordering some of those snap on teak steps to make it easier on my feet. :D
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby tex » Wed Sep 12, 2018 11:35 pm

ka8uet wrote:Source of the post I've got a fold down ladder (with the skinny steps!) from my transom steps on the port hull. It has a line so it can be pulled down from the water, and it's fully (all four steps!) underwater, which makes it easy, except for the skinny steps. I'm thinking of ordering some of those snap on teak steps to make it easier on my feet. :D


Yes, exactly. I’ve seen those add-on step thingies somewhere. My Admiral wants a couple of those staples (U-shaped stainless steel bars) on the swim platform to ease the access to and from the dinghy....nothing to hold on to except me. Here’s an example of “staples”.
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby ka8uet » Thu Sep 13, 2018 10:09 pm

I've got a handrail all the way down my molded in steps, so don't need "staples". I understand, though. I need handholds even on dry land!
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby tex » Sat Sep 15, 2018 11:32 pm

I’ve been watching for them on Craigslist and other places, but they’ve been too costly. The last set I found just right down Island from me, but they were $900! Good 2” stainless tube too, but just too much out of my Soc Sec account to justify! :shock:
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby CaptForce » Sun Sep 16, 2018 10:13 am

I had built a boarding ladder like Janice's on Seaweed, but I had put in rungs just 8" apart and extending about three feet into the water. This was a plan to allow Nancie more time for living aboard with her post-polio syndrome. My plan had one great weakness! When we were underway the ladder was folded up with the dinghy hung on davits aft so, there was no way to lower the ladder without first lowering the dinghy. Our retrieval of someone overboard depended on someone on board being aware of the rescue plan. This was to deploy the "Jim Bouy" long line rescue sling and circling behind the "man overboard". We used the halyard on the mizzen mast clipped to the rescue line that allowed Nancie to easily lift my weight aboard. This worked well in practice and once retrieving our Son in calm water, but I would not expect much success in rough weather. Even the easily accessed deployed ladder would be a wild swinging bludgeon in rough weather.
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby tex » Mon Sep 17, 2018 12:00 am

Yes, I worry about how successfully things will work and even if they will work at all. Sea conditions can only be accounted for up to a point, and ability to handle lines, winches, cranes or what-have-you can’t be duplicated in practice. My boat, left as it comes from the factory, is really difficult to board from the water. There’s more than one story of passengers not getting back aboard without lots of help. With the mods we did, it “should be” manageable IF the person overboard is conscious. Unconscious, ???
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Re: Falling off, getting back aboard.

Postby ka8uet » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:25 pm

Also depends on the agility of the crew overboard.

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