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MOB systems

Questions and answers about financing the dream, budgets, insurance, investments, taxes, and all things money related.
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tex
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MOB systems

Unread postby tex » Mon Aug 04, 2014 12:15 am

I've done about everything I can to facilitate my Admiral in being able to get me back aboard, should such an incident occur. I've probably spent 5K or so tuning our MOB system. With only two aboard, it will still require that the person you're trying to rescue is conscious enough to attach rigging or a Lifesling. Of course, ones best rewarded focus would be not to have it happen in the first place. We also have automatically inflating vests for wearing while underway. Automatic MOB emergency signaling will be part of our new VHF/GPs.

Do others here have MOB plans? Equipment?
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CaptForce
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby CaptForce » Mon Aug 04, 2014 1:36 am

We have the "Jim Bouy" hoop on the long polyolefin line that could be circled back around a MOB, but the person in the water would still need to be attentive and capable of slipping it under their arms. Our advantage with the mizzen mast is the high point to hoist up the person with the halyard winches, but you do have a dinghy hoist that could be used, right? In reality, our larger risk would likely be with one of us boarding at night and hitting our head on the way down. We think more of the risk at sea, but we never wear PFD's at the dock and we're a thousand times stepping on or off the boat at night compared to being out of the cockpit while underway.
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby scallywag » Mon Aug 04, 2014 12:04 pm

At times, I still bounce off of walls. I need to practice balancing on one foot than the other. The muscles in my right foot are not as strong as the left. My 86 y.o. Mother, has the same exercises. My wife has the same fear. Is this just a practice until perfect exercise? If you practiced at dock, maybe she would feel more confident when underway.

Dot and John
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CaptForce
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby CaptForce » Mon Aug 04, 2014 3:36 pm

scallywag wrote: ................. My wife has the same fear. Is this just a practice until perfect exercise? If you practiced at dock, maybe she would feel more confident when underway.

Dot and John


Is this "same fear" the concern with getting your spouse back on board with some retrieval mechanism and physical strength? It seems as if you're speaking of the "same fear" as being a concern for losing your balance and falling overboard. Both are important issues. Currently, our more recent risks have been a third issue. Loose boards on the finger piers that will flip up when you step outside the center supports!

How's that for a quick thread drift in three directions!
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby Robin » Mon Aug 04, 2014 4:21 pm

CaptForce wrote:
scallywag wrote: ................. My wife has the same fear. Is this just a practice until perfect exercise? If you practiced at dock, maybe she would feel more confident when underway.

Dot and John


Is this "same fear" the concern with getting your spouse back on board with some retrieval mechanism and physical strength? It seems as if you're speaking of the "same fear" as being a concern for losing your balance and falling overboard. Both are important issues. Currently, our more recent risks have been a third issue. Loose boards on the finger piers that will flip up when you step outside the center supports!

How's that for a quick thread drift in three directions!


Yep. priority #1 is don't fall overboard, most sailboats will have a jackline/jackstay system rigged to hook onto when going forward at sea, or crew clip onto the wire guardrails ( not always wise) Priority #2 is if you go over, at least stay linked to the boat via a harness and harness line (hopefully whilst not being dragged underwater) or# 3 at the very least wear a decent lifejacket so there is something floating for a rescuer to try and catch.

i have to admit to being a bit cavalier about lifejacket use over the years but would usually wear a harness in rough seas offshore, attached to strong wire jackstays run along the sidecks. We did bring our European combined fully automatic (Hanmar) lifejackets with inbuilt safety harnesses with us when we moved over here, but they are not USCG approved (only CE and Solas) so might get us a fine by the us CG if they did save us. :o

We have a Life Sling mounted on Roxanne, in a fixed frp case with quick release access mounted on the aft quarter deck and very easy to deploy. If it was me in the water needing the hoisting/recovery then the Admiral could use the fitted crane that we have mounted on the back for lifting the outboard up on board, with or without some extra help from the nearby cockpit sheet winches.

On 2nd and third thoughts I'll stay in the cockpit and clipped on too. Not allowed booze nowadays so the dock dive scenario is less likely. The real danger I suspect for me is the dinghy to boat transfer at anchor.
Last edited by Robin on Mon Aug 04, 2014 4:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby scallywag » Mon Aug 04, 2014 4:23 pm

Are they not the same fears? I guess it is a "I fell and can not get up". A swim platform and lifeguard training will help get someone back aboard. In lifeguard training, a 12 y.o. had to remove the 175 lb instructor out of the pool. For my high freeboard, the halyard would be the only answer. I guess the right response would be, wear a short lifeline attached to the vessel so you don't fall overboard. Tex--Thank you for posting the MOB question. I guess I have more work to do.

Dot and John
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby tex » Mon Aug 04, 2014 9:49 pm

Thanks to high bulwarks in the veranda, ease of access from the water is not one of my boats assets, but could be greatly enhanced with a swim step. Here in the photos of a sister ship, you can see how they approached the installation of a swim platform. The transom tailgate folds down on the platform, but look at all the things there to step over or trip over. This system works well for the owner, but I don't want to spend that kind of money for that result. Click on image to enlarge.
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby tex » Thu Aug 07, 2014 5:23 pm

Since my Admiral and I are prolific users of coves and anchorages for swimming, a substantial swim platform would probably double or triple our usage of the boat from our dock behind our residence. I looked again at the huge, unappologetic platforms on the Great Harbour Trawlers and supposed that I might consider something that large provided it wouldn't affect the performance of the boat in following seas.

I got the opportunity to watch a Great Harbor N-47 docked across from me at our tiny marina in Stuart, FL. The entrance is backed up to the St. Lucie river, so plenty of steep wakes roll in all day. No matter how steep the wake, the GH just lifted above it. Breaking waves might be a whole other issue in a following sea, so I imagined I'd square off about 6" of the transom and build the platform to fold up in such a situation.

Here's the view of the platform on the great harbor, and how it would look on my own boat (Photoshopped). I could easily cut out some reliefs for additional water drainage. This kind of platform and the addition of it's very substantial ladder or guardrail (perhaps relocated to one side or the other) would be an asset to our MOB plan. The over-board person could be lifted to the platform with either the dinghy crane or either side of the dinghy davits overhead, and of course, the swim platform itself would be a great asset to how we use the boat.
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CaptForce
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby CaptForce » Thu Aug 07, 2014 5:48 pm

I used to have a vessel with permanant transom steps. Not a ladder, but simply aluminum steps that each had a hand hold and the step surface on an angle of aluminum fastened to the hull.
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby scallywag » Fri Aug 08, 2014 5:39 pm

I have a ladder that folds up when not in use. The ladder did not help my wife. With short legs, she could not climb over the life lines, so she did not try climbing that ladder. She refused to try the rope ladder with plastic rungs tied to the life line opening on the side of the vessel. Scallywag has a high freeboard. Scallywag was on a mooring in Salt Run, so, that day, she stayed in the dingy. I am thinking of using a mooring downtown so she can use the courtesy boat. MOB system is a problem even with the halyards and winches.

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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby RTB » Sat Aug 09, 2014 1:38 am

CaptForce wrote:We have the "Jim Bouy" hoop on the long polyolefin line that could be circled back around a MOB, but the person in the water would still need to be attentive and capable of slipping it under their arms. Our advantage with the mizzen mast is the high point to hoist up the person with the halyard winches, but you do have a dinghy hoist that could be used, right? In reality, our larger risk would likely be with one of us boarding at night and hitting our head on the way down. We think more of the risk at sea, but we never wear PFD's at the dock and we're a thousand times stepping on or off the boat at night compared to being out of the cockpit while underway.


Yesterday, we hauled the dinghy up onto the dock here at the marina. We were going to clean the bottom. Once on the dock, my wife walked around the stern of the dink, and somehow managed to trip, fall, bump her head, and roll into the water. Luckily, she didn't hit her head hard. She swam to the stern of our boat, and came up our ladder, which I keep down into the water. Unfortunately, the marina here doesn't have ladders, and getting up onto the dock would be pretty difficult if you don't have a lot of upper body strength.

For MOB offshore, I have a lifesling. If my wife goes overboard, I could probably position the boat fairly quickly, and get her aboard if she was conscious. If she was knocked out, not sure if I could get her back. If I go overboard, I'm probably a dead man. Maybe it would be different with a m/v? With sails up on a sailboat, things will happen slowly, since you can't just stop. Also, circling around is going to take some time, and separation between the boat and the MOB could contribute to losing the location of the person in the water, especially if there are some good sized seas.

Best to clip in, and not go overboard.

Ralph
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scallywag
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby scallywag » Sat Aug 09, 2014 7:27 pm

Okay, now I know Dot will not let me walk on the dock. Thanks We hope Beverly is doing well.

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CaptForce
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby CaptForce » Sun Aug 10, 2014 6:19 am

Nancie and I are presently keeping our bicycles locked ashore, but we keep our helmets on the boat. When walking to or from our bikes I usually wear my bicycle helmet with my hands full of grocery bags. Maybe there's some merit to this, - "dock safety?"
Actually, with fifty years of boating, I've only fallen in once and that was when I was attempting to step off onto the unlit dock at night and was surprised that the dock wasn't there. Earlier that same day we had moved our boat after having the dock to port for about five years.
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby scallywag » Sun Aug 10, 2014 11:29 am

Due to my accident a few years ago, my ankle muscles are not as strong s they should be. Sometime the ankle just gives way and I bounce off of the wall. I have not bounced off of a young beautiful lass. Shucks! Anyway, that is my wife's fear. Yes, I do have an exercise for balance and strengthening the ankle.

Dot and John
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Re: MOB systems

Unread postby Jaxfishgyd » Sun Aug 10, 2014 12:37 pm

I can tell you that I saw Tex fall into the water the day AFTER we got his boat safely delivered to his home at Key Biscayne... We cruised to "No Name harbor" and as we were tying up to the seawall, I heard a SPLASH at the stern.... His Admiral looked at me, I looked at her, then we saw Tex climbing up the stern of the boat..... So his Admiral and I, (after trying to stop laughing) went up to the restaurant for drinks while waiting on Tex to take a shower and change his clothes..... :lol:
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