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Prosthetic and living aboard

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ambermcmahan77
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:44 pm
Your Vessel Info: I am a 41 year old single mom, recently lost my right leg above the knee and have learned to walk and operate with a prosthetic. I do use a wheelchair at night or crutches depending on the room I'm working with. I'm looking for something that can accommodate myself and my 12 year old daughter to live aboard. It does not have to have wheelchair accessibility, as I can operate without one. It was a dream before I lost my leg, now I'm going to bring it to life.
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Prosthetic and living aboard

Unread postby ambermcmahan77 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:57 pm

Greetings from Galveston, Texas area, I'm very serious about living aboard and I'm an amputee above the knee on my right leg. It's only about a year that I've been walking again and would like as much advice about living aboard with this as a condition. I'm a single mom of a 12 year old so I'm searching for something that will accommodate us comfortably. We do not mind close quarters or small spaces. That actually is easier for me to get around. Any and all advice is welcome. Thanks in advance and nice to meet you all.

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RTB
Posts: 368
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2014 2:26 pm
Your Vessel Info: 1982 Hunter 36 (Cherubini)
Location: Brunswick, Ga.
Has Liked: 151 times
Been Liked: 68 times

Re: Prosthetic and living aboard

Unread postby RTB » Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:50 pm

Hi and welcome! Got a name?

You should be fine on most any boat really. We have a paraplegic here at our marina. Currently on a 50' trawler. Previously, when he arrived, he was on a small sailing catamaran. He gets around!

Fred (the paraplegic) is quite the inspiration, despite the fact that he believes that he has no disability. Well...he doesn't....he just manages differently than most of us.

Go for it! You will find a way to move about.

P.S. I am from Texas too. Living aboard for 7 years. Currently in Brunswick, Georgia at a very liveaboard-friendly marina.

Find a boat - power or sail that is comfortable for you. Most boats have stairs. Less stairs might be better for you? Kady Krogan Manatee's have everything on one level (if I recall correctly). But really...I think you would be fine on most sailing or power vessels.
But Why's the Rum Gone?

1982 (Cherubini)Hunter 36
s/v FUGUE
User avatar

RTB
Posts: 368
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2014 2:26 pm
Your Vessel Info: 1982 Hunter 36 (Cherubini)
Location: Brunswick, Ga.
Has Liked: 151 times
Been Liked: 68 times

Re: Prosthetic and living aboard

Unread postby RTB » Mon Jul 22, 2019 7:04 pm

RTB wrote:Source of the post Hi and welcome! Got a name?

You should be fine on most any boat really. We have a paraplegic here at our marina. Currently on a 50' trawler. Previously, when he arrived, he was on a small sailing catamaran. He gets around!

Fred (the paraplegic) is quite the inspiration, despite the fact that he believes that he has no disability. Well...he doesn't....he just manages differently than most of us.

Go for it! You will find a way to move about.

P.S. I am from Texas too. Living aboard for 7 years. Currently in Brunswick, Georgia at a very liveaboard-friendly marina.

Find a boat - power or sail that is comfortable for you. Most boats have stairs. Less stairs might be better for you? Kady Krogan Manatee's have everything on one level (if I recall correctly). But really...I think you would be fine on most sailing or power vessels.


Ralph
But Why's the Rum Gone?

1982 (Cherubini)Hunter 36
s/v FUGUE
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tex
Posts: 1623
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 5:27 pm
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Re: Prosthetic and living aboard

Unread postby tex » Wed Jul 24, 2019 10:16 am

Hey Amber: Welcome aboard. Yes, lots of disabled folks living aboard all styles of boats. You didn’t make mention of any budget level in your post. Of course, one could spend all the money one wants to, but I sense you don’t want to go overboard (pun intended). A powerboat would likely be easier to handle than a sailboat. Do you have a preference? How do you envision you future aboard. Cruising long distances, visits around the local areas, mostly staying at the dock?

Don’t allow any lack of confidence in handling your vessel to become a determining factor in what kind of boating you do. We all started that way. We all grew out of the temporary overwhelm that come with such a learning curve, and overcoming daily challenges builds all the skill and confidence you want.
When life is hard, eat marshmallows!
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CaptForce
Posts: 1041
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 2:01 pm
Your Vessel Info: Morgan Out Island 41
Location: Lived Aboard 45 Years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet!
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Re: Prosthetic and living aboard

Unread postby CaptForce » Fri Jul 26, 2019 8:05 am

I have no specific suggestions other than to agree that living aboard with such a disability is feasible. Back in the 70's a friend of ours raced his Ericson sloop with his lower limb paralysis. We sometimes crewed with him. He left his chair on the dock and maneuvered aboard his boat with the use of his boom. The close distances and his ingenuity allowed him full access of his boat. When racing he remained at the helm while the crew took on any task on the fore deck. For every day life aboard I believe that the most important task would be managing a safe means to move from the dock to the boat and back.

There is another issue related to your intended use of the boat beyond living aboard. We sold our boat and moved ashore due to my wife's loss of mobility; however, this was due to the loss of our cruising life. Sailing offshore with safely moving about a pounding deck is a different life. Our life aboard was a physical adventure beyond living aboard in protected water. Not that this can not be achieved as well, but we are also now in our seventies and we didn't see a future with adapting to my wife's physical loss.
Take care and joy, Aythya crew

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